Dani Energetike i investicija

12th INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AND INVESTMENT DAYS

November, 1st & 2nd, 2023 Novi Sad

Energy efficiency and renewable sources in buildings.

Topics

Topic 1

Just Transition - Energy Poverty and Social Issues

November 1st 2023 - 10:50 – 12:50 h

Topic 2

Improving Air Quality - Energy Supply and the "e-Footprint" of Buildings

November 1st 2023 - 13:45 – 15:45 h

Topic 3

Housing Communities and the Green Agenda

November 2nd 2023 - 10:00 – 12:00 h

Topic 4

Financing Mechanisms as a Driving Force for Energy Retrofitting of Residential Buildings

November 2nd 2023 - 12:15 – 14:15 h

Topics

Topic 1

Just Transition - Energy Poverty and Social Issues

Climate change is accelerating, and we have the opportunity to witness its increasingly devastating consequences every day.  In this unenviable situation, a green energy transition is inevitable, involving mandatory improvements in energy efficiency and a transition to greater energy production from renewable sources and the abandonment of energy production from fossil fuels. The green transition can bring multiple and significant benefits to human health and a cleaner environment, to the economy and society, but at the same time it can affect industry, mining and the development of the country’s energy sector. Therefore, when implementing the energy transition, special care must be taken to ensure that it is not only green, but also fair. This requires that the necessary steps and measures are planned strategically and in a timely manner to minimise job losses and ensure social justice, social protection, and opportunities for economic prosperity for all citizens, especially those who are already socially and economically vulnerable.

Aleksandar Macura, moderator
Jovana Joksimović, Ministry of Mining and Energy of the Republic of Serbia
Biljana Grbić, Energy Community
Violeta Pavlović, City of Valjevo
Jasminka Young, RES Foundation
Jovan Protić, International Labour Organization
Andrew Popelka, Independent International Expert for Energy Efficiency
Ružica Vranjković, journalist
Emira Mešanović, International Centre Olof Palme

Topic 2

Improving Air Quality - Energy Supply and the "e-Footprint" of Buildings

Air pollution has become one of the most pressing global problems today. High levels of air pollution have a detrimental effect on countries and their economies, requiring huge investments in the fight against pollution, which damages flora and fauna, causes acid rain, leads to a reduction in solar radiation and the creation of ozone holes, and generally disturbs the climate balance. Most importantly, long-term exposure to air pollution is very harmful to human health and can result in a number of serious health consequences, including diseases such as stroke, ischaemic heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer, as well as premature death. Our country is not exempt from this global problem either, as researches show and confirm, Serbia is among the first in Europe in terms of mortality due to air pollution. The biggest air polluters in the winter months are mainly individual boiler furnaces, but also the heating sector and industry, district heating systems and motor vehicles. In addition to raising awareness and educating the general public on this issue, it is necessary to work on appropriate solutions involving the replacement of small individual boiler furnaces in households, the wider use of ecological technologies, as well as afforestation and other ecological measures that can help mitigate this problem.

Dušan Jović, moderator
Stefan Badža, Office of the Prime Minister Ana Brnabić
Peter Vajda, Energy Community - CARI
Boris Lubarda, Ministry of Energy and Mining of the Republic of Srpska
Bojan Ivković, City of Pirot
Dejan Stojanović, Business Association "Toplane Srbije"
Dušan Macura, Novi Sad District Heating Company
Ružica Vranjković, journalist
Branko Glavonjić, Faculty of Forestry of the University of Belgrade

Topic 3

Housing Communities and the Green Agenda

Today, all over the world, we are increasingly experiencing extreme natural disasters such as devastating droughts and floods, melting ice and rising sea levels, or devastating earthquakes. These are all consequences of climate change that are linked to environmental pollution. The causes of this pollution are numerous, but residential buildings are at the top of the list when it comes to bad influence. According to the European Commission, buildings in the EU are responsible for up to 40% of energy consumption and 36% of greenhouse gas emissions, and the situation in our country is even worse. If we add to all this the fact that at least one third of residential buildings in Serbia are older than 50 years, it tells us that the greatest potential for energy savings lies precisely in the construction industry, namely 30-40%. Housing associations and their managers will play an indispensable and central role in initiating and massifying the energy retrofitting of the housing stock in Serbia. In order for them to actively and constructively participate in this process, it will be of utmost importance in the coming period to strengthen the capacity of housing associations and building managers to develop and implement energy retrofit projects, but also to continuously raise citizens’ awareness of the need and benefits of this task through information campaigns and the establishment of energy information centres at the local level.

Marko Arsenijević, moderator
Damjan Miljanić, The Municipality of Kula
Mirjana Kovačević, Serbian Chamber of Commerce and Industry
Sanja Sovran, Infinity Global Consulting
Stevan Novković, Association "Initiative for Better Housing"
Ružica Vranjković, journalist
Marko Filipović, Building manager of a housing association from Valjevo

Topic 4

Financing Mechanisms as a Driving Force for Energy Retrofitting of Residential Buildings

What is the biggest obstacle to more successful and massive energy retrofitting of residential buildings in Serbia? The reasons can be found in the underdeveloped awareness of citizens about the need for energy retrofitting and its benefits, lack of motivation and initiative, but also practical and professional knowledge about the preparation and implementation of such projects. However, the basic prerequisite for the successful implementation of energy retrofit measures in the building stock is adequate and sustainable sources of financing.  These include special credit lines and investment programmes for residential buildings, as well as guarantee funds that would provide the necessary lending support for sustainable energy measures in buildings. Numerous initiatives for energy retrofitting of residential buildings have aroused the interest of the banking sector in creating special products, i.e. credit lines, for residential communities. In the past period, three commercial banks have started to develop special credit lines for housing associations. This is a significant step forward, but we still have a lot of serious work to do, especially in relation to the definition of complementary policies and support and implementation mechanisms (establishment of guarantee funds/programmes, development of the ESCO market, provision of social category subsidy mechanisms, definition of investment maintenance fees, etc..) to start the rehabilitation of the housing fund from a “dead point”.

Ankica Barbulov, moderator
Ognjen Popović, Ministry of Finance of the Republic of Serbia
Ira Birnbaum, Federal Energy Management Program, U.S. Department of Energy
Tijana Marjanac, Fund for Environmental Protection and Energy Efficiency of the Republic of Srpska
Aleksandar Čortan, Postal Savings Bank
Nenad Tintor, Pro Credit
Marko Čubrić, Erste bank
Ružica Vranjković, journalist
Zoran Nikolić, National Consumer Association of Serbia